God is Good!

Seek the Lord while He may be found!

A Day Never To Be Forgotten

Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (center), the future Pope John XXIII.  Photo from 1901, via Wikipedia

Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (center), the future Pope John XXIII. Photo from 1901, via Wikipedia

On June 22, 1959, fifty-seven short years ago, on the Feasts of Sts. Peter and Paul, I  attended the Solemn Feast Day Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, celebrated by the then reigning Pontiff, Pope John XXIII.

With a good seat, I enjoyed a close view of this humble man, with the Cardinals as his altar boys, offering up the Body and Blood of Christ as a perfect Sacrifice of praise to God. In the splendor and beauty of the Basilica, the world’s largest place of worship, with the music of the Sistine Choir filling its interior, one could only experience a happiness close to that of Heaven.

In attending these ceremonies, I brought into my life an unforgettable experience of faith. No one could remain unaffected by the outpouring of the voices of the vast multitude and solemn actions at the Altar.  My personal impact was great – I was so happy and proud to be a Priest!

In my mind’s eye, I can still see the great Pope slowing genuflecting at the Altar, his deliberate motions of reverence, his emotion filled with voice pronouncing the words of the Consecration, “This is My Body” and “This is My Blood.”

How well to think often of the precious possessions we have as active believers in God. If God is real, He deserves public worship from His people.  Gather with other believers on a regular basis to offer thanks and praise to His Greatness, not just half-heartedly, but truly, with joy and enthusiasm.

Fr. George Mc Kenna

A note to Fr. McKenna’s faithful readers – my apologies.  I did not realize until I was preparing the Blog for this weekend, that I had left this message in the “Draft” stage on the site.  I am sure you are now enjoying it – just a little late this time.   JGT

June 17, 2016 Posted by | Bulletins | , , , , , | 6 Comments

A Source Of Joy In Living

Possibly the most famous person to keep a journal. Anne Frank in 1940, Amsterdam (the Netherlands). Unknown photographer; Collectie Anne Frank Stichting Amsterdam via Wikipedia

Possibly the most famous person to keep a journal.
Anne Frank in 1940, Amsterdam (the Netherlands). Unknown photographer; Collectie Anne Frank Stichting Amsterdam via Wikipedia

During my life, I have used my bookshelves to store my journals, long legal sized pads of yellow paper (14 x 8.5 inches), filled with my own handwriting. Many of these are now safely stored in my niece’s basement.

In these pages, I have written happenings and personal impressions of my life over the years, along with my accounts of my many travels to various countries. How interesting to open one of these pads and read what I wrote ten or fifteen years ago and connect with my feelings at the time.  In my travel journals I have taped in foreign currency, maps, railroad tickets, and postcards of the places I have visited.

A journal speaks of many things, people one meets during the day, ideas culled from readings or conversations, the vision one has in living. There is no limit to the subject matter for one’s “Book of Life”.  A fresh awareness of life and its beauty creeps into the thinking of anyone who perseveres in keeping a journal.

Many happenings may make their way into a journal:

A thought-provoking line from a book

A striking idea from a homily given at Mass

A few phrases of poetry too good to forget

A thought from a newspaper columnist

A phrase from Holy Scripture

 

Ideals written down can make a deep impression on the mind of the writer. Personal growth becomes more pronounced.  Later on, the journal keeper can turn back the clock of time, and read of past experiences of exultation, despair, and moments of hope and anger.

Fr. George Mc Kenna

June 5, 2016 Posted by | Bulletins | , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments